codyjohnston:

This brave woman was arrested earlier today for peacefully protesting alongside that Holocaust survivor I mentioned earlier. Tons of other similar tweets of people walking in small groups, getting gassed without question or warning. It’s a shit show down there. A disgrace.

Don’t watch the news. Watch people.

(via kiransingh)

“Ever been married?”
“Well, now, let’s not ruin a lovely night out by getting personal.”

(Source: phyllix, via emmaswans)

carnivaloftherandom:

glutenfreewaffles:

Ladies of the MCU + Misogyny

"Whatever women do, they must do twice as well as men to be thought half as good. Luckily, this is not difficult." - Charlotte Whitton

AUTO-REBLOGGING FOREVER.

(via ilovebuckybear)

To create that relationship with him and to resee him as my brother, it was easy. And then, to have to say ‘No’ to him it’s very very difficult because he’s so- he’s a deeply emotional actor. And a very v u l n e r a b l e actor. And very raw. - Andrew Garfield 

(Source: tyesheridann, via fuckyeahparksborn)

cactesse:

thesoftghetto:

Protesters upset about the smearing of Mike Brown converged at CNN headquarters.

people complain sooo much about social media and “twitter activism” completely ignoring that without social media the only way anyone would know whats going on is through media controlled by straight, white, capitalist men

(via secondyears)

chryswatchesgot:

Chrys Watches GoT [x]

Yay, she went back to the beginning I am so happy. Also this makes me want to talk about their clothes and hair a lot. Also pokemon <3 I picked Charmander to start too obvs

Hey, White Americans. We Need to Talk.

postcardsfromspace:

According to a Pew Research survey, only 37% of white Americans think the events in #Ferguson raise important issues about race.

Okay, fellow white people. We need to talk.

Let me tell you a story: I was an angry punk teenager. Not violent, but I did a shitton of trespassing, and I got into a lot of screaming matches with cops.

I have never been arrested.

I have never been violently attacked by police. Hell, I have never been seriously threatened by police.

I am fully aware that I’ve survived to adulthood largely on the benefits of my race.

When you are white in America, you get away with all sorts of shit. Have you read this account from a white dude who actively tried to get himself arrested? You should. It’s telling.

So, if that’s your main frame of reference for dealing with law enforcement, it is really easy to assume that when someone else gets targeted by the police, they must have done something really bad. After all, you know the police aren’t that petty, right? They’re there to help: That’s what TV tells you, what your teachers told you, what your parents told you. “If you’re in trouble, find a police officer. They’ll help.” And, y’know, if you’re white, most of the time, that’s probably true.

When you’re white in America, it is awfully easy to pretend that you don’t live in a country where the nonviolent physical presence of black people, especially black men, is considered sufficient threat to justify use of lethal force. It’s really easy to pretend that laws are enforced equally; that arrest rate has any demographic resemblance to actual crime rates; that the police are there to protect us from the bad guys.

And, I mean, I get that. It’s a lot more comfortable to pretend that safety correlates to virtue than to confront the ugly truth that a system that benefits you very directly does so at the cost of other people’s lives; that what you were taught was the just reward for being a good person is, in fact, the privilege of your skin. That’s a big part of why we work so hard to retcon narratives about how the black people our police murder must have been dangerous, highlight every casual infraction like it’s a killing spree. We are so desperate to believe that the system that feeds us is just.

It doesn’t feel good to acknowledge that stuff. It feels gross. A system we trusted—one we should be able to trust, that should work for the benefit and protection of everyone has made us accomplice to some deeply horrifying shit.

But here’s the thing:

This happenedThis is happening. Not recognizing it; stonewalling and insulating ourselves in our little bubbles does not make it go away.

And not acknowledging it, not having asked for it, does not make us any less complicit, or any less responsible for owning and fixing this. We are actively benefitting from a fucked, corrupt, murderous system. That is on us. As it should be.

So educate yourself, get the tools, and start dismantling this fucker. You have the time: after all,  no one’s shooting at your kids.

Privilege is the bandwidth to speak up and dismantle because you’re not in fear for your life. And there is no conscionable excuse for failing to use it.

(Source: imalittleredtorvette)

greenkaorichan:

There had been lot of debate regarding the whole “How Leia remembers Padmé” issue. Some people say that it was a major retcon of the PT, other say that Leia was remembering his adoptive mother, Breha Organa, because there is no way that a newborn would remember her mother.

However, during my Star Wars rewatch, I figured that it’s not unplausible or impossible that Leia has memories of Padmé. And here is why.

In The Empire Strikes Back, Yoda tells Luke about the Force:

"Through the Force, things you will see. Other places. The future…the past. Old friends long gone

Leia is Force-sensitive. Like her father and twin brother, she has a great amount of midichlorians running in her veins, and thus, is possible that may had more consciousness than an average newborn. The Revenge of the Sith novelization even points that Leia was born with her eyes open (in contrast to Luke, who was with his eyes tight shut during their birth) and looked in direction to Padmé as if she wanted to “memorize her face”. On top of that, Leia mentions to Luke that she only remembers “images, feelings”, nothing concrete. No flashbacks, no memories, just images and feelings.

You can even argue that Leia may had Force visions of Padmé and she confusses with memories. Who knows if she, as a young child, saw Padmé in her dreams? Images of Padmé in her last days, in Naboo, or during her dying moments? Inside the movie, the moment they focus Padmé’s face as she dies, we don’t get to see the other side of her bed. Probably the droid who held baby Leia moved to her side and showed her her daughter and BUM! Mother-daughter bonding, and Leia gained visions or precocious memories of Padmé.

Now I want more Padmé-Leia mother-daughter bonding stories.

(via clubjade)